Brain Injury Awareness Month

Brain Injury Awareness Day on Capitol Hill, March 18

One of the advocacy events that I loved being a part of when I lived in the Washington DC was Brain Awareness Day on Capitol Hill.    I have been working hard preparing for the event with a group called the Brain Injury Ambassadors Council.   We are a group of people with brain injury who are interested in raising awareness about brain injury and we have been working with the Brain Injury Association of America to this end.  Many of the members of our group will be present at the event, although I won’t be there this year.

Brain Injury Awareness Day is a tremendous opportunity to advocate to one’s Representative and/or Senators about the issues that are important to those of us who have experienced TBI.

Its also an opportunity to meet other people with traumatic brain injury and their families and to meet professionals people who are passionate about helping people with traumatic brain injury.    The first event of the day is an Brain Injury Awareness Fair where you can learn about what different organizations are doing to help people with brain injury including programs and treatments.     I will post a list of organizations that will be present at the Fair at the bottom of the blogpost

There is also a panel presentation every year to educate Members of Congress and their staffs about brain injury issues.

This year, Mac Fedge, and his mom and caregiver, Kathy Fedge, will be speaking on the topic of “Finding a New Normal”.

I have the pleasure of knowing Mac and Kathy and I know they will do a great job of telling it like it is.   I wish I could be there to see them speak!

Many years ago, Mac and I were both members of the Speakers Bureau at Brain Injury Services of Northern Virginia and I was always very impressed with how hard Mac worked at his recovery and I feel lucky to have gotten to watch and be part of supporting some of that progress.  Go Mac!

And the last event of the day is a Reception where there’s another opportunity to talk and get to know lawmakers, participants and the community around brain injury recovery.

Here’s the schedule for Brain Injury Awareness Day on Capitol Hill on Wednesday, March 18, 2015

Representative Bill Pascrell, Jr. (D-N.J.) and Representative Thomas J. Rooney (R-Fla.), Co-Chairs of the Congressional Brain Injury Task Force in association with the Brain Injury Association of America cordially invite you to participate in the 2015 Brain Injury Awareness Day on Capitol Hill.

Brain Injury Awareness Day Schedule of Events
10:00 AM – 2:00 PM
Brain Injury Awareness Fair
Rayburn House Office Building, First Floor Foyer

2:30 PM – 4:00 PM
Briefing: Finding a “New Normal” – Post Injury
Supports and Services that Make a Difference
Cannon House Office Building, Room 121

Bobby Silverstein
Moderator
Principal, Powers, Pyles, Sutter, & Verville

Mac Fedge
TBI Survivor

Kathy Fedge
TBI Family Caregiver

William Ditto
Chair of the NASHIA Public Policy Committee

Matt Breiding, PhD
Commander, U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps
Traumatic Brain Injury Team Lead

David Williamson, M.D.
Neuropsychiatrist & Medical Director, Inpatient Traumatic Brain Injury Program,
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center

5:00 PM – 7:00 PM
Reception Celebrating Brain Injury Awareness Month
Rayburn House Office Building, Room B-33

2015 Exhibitors

 

American Association for Hyperbaric Awareness

American College of Radiology Head Injury Institute

American Medical Rehabilitation Providers Association

American Music Therapy Association

American Occupational Therapy Association

American Physical Therapy Association

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association

American Therapeutic Recreation Association

Association of Rehabilitation Nurses

BAE Systems

Black Box Biometrics, Inc.

Bob Woodruff Foundation

Brain Injury Alliance of New Jersey

Brain Injury Association of America

Brain Injury Association of D.C.

BrainLine

BrainScope Company, Inc.

Brain Trauma Foundation

C3 Logix

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), National Center for Injury and Prevention

Control

Children’s National Health System

Drexel University College of Medicine and Society for Neuroscience

DVBIC, DCoE

Federal Emergency Management Agency

Federal Interagency Traumatic Brain Injury Research (FITBIR)

Kessler Foundation

Kessler Institute for Rehabilitation

MedStar National Rehabilitation Hospital

Model Systems Knowledge Translation Center

National Association of State Head Injury Administrators

National Institutes of Health (NIH)/ National Institute for Neurological Disorders and Stroke

(NINDS)/ Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

National Interscholastic Athletic Administrators Association

National Intrepid Center of Excellence

Neurovive Pharma

Positive Strides

Rehabilitation Specialists

Rusk Rehabilitation at NYU Langone Medical Center

Safe Kids Worldwide

Sport Safety International

Sukyo Mahikari

Triax Technologies, Inc.

U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, United States Army Medical Materiel

Development Activity 

U.S. Army of the Suregon

United States Brain Injury Alliance

Vista LifeSciences

Veterans Health Administration

Wounded Warrior Project

Read More - Brain Injury Awareness Day on Capitol Hill, March 18

Bruce Alterman Memorial Webinar Series

New Webinar series at BIAA by people with brain injury for their peers

One of the many highlights of this week, was getting to listen to Maria Romanas, MD PhD talk during a Butch Alterman Webinar through the Brain Injury Association of America (BIAA).

The webinars are FREE.   You must register for them.    You can download handouts even if you did not watch or register to watch.

I will provide the links at the end of this post so that you can learn about future webinars, and download handouts from past ones.

Before I write down what I learned from the webinar last week, I want to step back and explain about this new webinar Series through BIAA.

The Butch Alterman Webinar Series:

The Butch Alterman Webinar series is a relatively new series.   It was started in 2014 and there have already been 4 webinars (including Maria Romanas’s)

It is a webinar series for people with brain injury by people who have gotten better after brain injury and who have been selected to share their understanding, strategies or knowledge from their journey and from their hard-fought experience and learning about what helped them.

The series was created by Mo Alterman, in memory of her husband, Butch who had had a brain injury.   Butch Alterman was a teacher by profession.

After he died, the series was created by his wife to honor her husband’s belief in the importance of teaching.

I am fortunate that I got to meet Mo Alterman years ago.   Mo was the President of the Board at BIAA in the early 2000’s.   I started volunteering at BIAA in about 2003, after  we returned to Washington DC.   At the time, I could not get help matching the skills I had post-injury with a job opportunity.   After I met Robert Demichalis, a volunteer at BIAA, he invited me to share his office and use a second desk in his office.   I thought it would be a great opportunity to learn what job skills I actually had and learn about the Brain Injury Association of America.

Back to Mo.   I was impressed by her because she was tough and outspoken and a tireless advocate for people with brain injury.  She believed in the importance of improving the lives of people with brain injury.   Of course, she was not alone in that belief at BIAA, it was just that she was passionate and I “got her” immediately.   My experience working with the staff and people who volunteer their time and energy to BIAA is that they all want to improve the lives of people with brain injury.   I have over 10 years of experience volunteering at BIAA and I have both received tremendous support in my journey to recovery and I have learned an incredible amount of helpful information from them.   I have also contributed from my perspective as a person with brain injury  in many ways.   (My volunteer work is another blog post which still needs to be written!)

One last thing about Mo.   I felt very drawn to Mo as a leader, just like many others did.   Her dedication and passion were inspiring.   And her knowledge about brain injury and her own personal journey to help her husband get the resources he needed were obvious in her command of  the issues.

Here are the links to get information and register for the Butch Alterman Webinars:

Some tips about the links and technology:

With my cognitive and visual issues from my brain injury, I often have a difficult time finding information on many websites.   To summarize, I often cannot even find where on the website the information I need lives, trying to find it may increase my frustration to intolerable levels, and I leave the website empty handed, frustrated, and angry.   Worse, being on a really busy website may set off headaches or other symptoms and depending on the stage of recovery I am in, and thus I may have to get emergency cognitive rest, or change my day in order to get over the damage that the busy website has done to my wellness.

On any given day, I can have problems with the Brain Injury Association of America’s website because it is very busy.

So I want to help others who may have some of the same issues with finding and using what they need on websites the information that may help them.

Having been empowered by my accessible technology team at Cognizant and my advisor, Joseph Karr O’Connor, I want to pass on what I have learned so that you may be able to take advantage of this excellent Webinar series at BIAA and the resources that it makes available to you.

Before you click on any of the links below, please read through to the bottom so you will know what to expect.

Writing down the steps before you press a link may be helpful.

Writing things the steps for yourself on a blank piece of paper will help imprint the steps in your brain.

You may want to rearrange the steps once you have written them down,  depending on what makes sense for your deficits and the way your brain works.

And remember, in trying to sign up for a webinar, you are both doing something new and trying to follow many steps.

Give yourself plenty of time and space to do this, and recognize that you may not get it right the first time, and that is okay.

As Dr Maria Romanas will tell you in her talk, doing anything that is new, is harder.

As Dr Maria Romanas recommends for starting any new task,  take two deep breaths before you try to execute these steps.

And remember, that people with out brain injuries, may have a difficult time following these steps as they may not have been optimized as well as possible for someone learning for the first time and finding the right buttons.   I know that my husband, someone who works in on-line technology has told me that often websites will say press here, and they have not put a button on that page to press.   Frustrating for anyone even if your brain works fine.

Below is the link that tells you about the Webinars series:

Click on it.

http://www.biausa.org/education/altermanwebinars

If you want to register for the Webinar:

Click the link below.

http://www.biausa.org/biaa-events.htm

Once you have clicked on it, scroll down to the midway down the page until you find the upcoming Alterman Webinair.

If you want to download handouts for the a Webinar, or a past one:

Click on the link below;

http://www.biausa.org/education/altermanwebinars

Scroll down to the heading that says Recording and Handouts of Previous Alterman Webinars.

Click on first link after the webinar handouts that you want.

Lastly, I have learned the trick of using Google to search the BIAA website.   I put “Butch Alterman Webinars at Brain injury Association of America” in the search bar and that worked.

I need your feedback!

Do you have problems with searching and finding information on websites?   Please leave me a comment and describe tips that help you.

Also, I will have to think about what the best way to give these links and improve them.  Please give me feedback if you were able to use them or better ways to write them so that they are easy to go to.

Having tried to make my website more accessible, I know that sometimes finding what works best is trial and error and I would like to learn more about what works best.

Read More - New Webinar series at BIAA by people with brain injury for their peers

People seldom improve when they have no other model but themselves to copy - Oliver Goldsmith

Empowerment from Role Models

One of the many things that I found empowering working with my Team AxIS and my advisor, Joseph O’Connor was that they used the computer so, well, easily.

I realize the descriptor easily may sound like a funny use of terms.  Of course designers, developers and usability experts would use the computer easily!

And, especially when compared to my computer use.

Because my team knew how to use the computer to create the website that we talked about, I could watch them do things in a short period of time.  What they were able to do was so far beyond my abilities.  I could literally see things that we talked about taking shape before my eyes.  Sometimes it wasn’t quite that fast.

However,  my team was in India, and their day was my night.

So sometimes they would work on the site while I was sleeping.

And so I would wake up and start my day and when I looked at the computer,  there would be an email to open.

And the email would show me suggestions that my team had for how to make the ideas we talked about the night before take shape.

Some days it seemed instantaneously.

Some days it might take longer.   Often I was just getting used to an idea when it was already mocked up.

Just to say something I have learned about myself and my decisions is that I definitely have delayed processing post-injury and so it often takes me awhile to get used to an idea.   I may have had slower decision-making prior to my injury, its hard to know.   What I do know is that my decision-making is slower post-injury and so getting used to that and working around that is part of my “new normal”.

Back to my website and my team.  From my point of view, my new website began to take shape very quickly.

To me part of the empowerment that I felt from participating in the Knowbility Open Air Contest, was that watching my team gave me hope that one day I will use the computer much more easily and much faster like I could see that they do!

I was an early adopter of computer technology before my injury and I know the benefits that the appropriate use of technology could give me to enhancing my productivity and quality of life.

However, with my slowed learning following my injury and the difficulties I have had with the distractions of the computer as well as the trade-off I face in terms of energy loss from concentrating in front of a screen, and countless other issues that I don’t have a grasp on yet,  I have had a difficult time with experiencing gains from the computer.

Watching what my team could do not only motivated me and gave me hope just by seeing what they could do.

They also broke down for me new learning.  I would get an email saying these are the steps you need to talk to do this.   In others words, they gave me procedural information that I could follow.

First you do this, then you do that.

And I can follow simple instructions that tell me what to do and when.

Often I cannot break things down for myself.

But if the instructions are good and precise (and do not skip any steps), then I can follow them.

And if I cannot follow them the first time, I can try again and again until I learn them.

And I feel so empowered when I am successful at doing step one and then step two and then step three.

When I have hope because I can see where others are able to do and when I have a complete step by step approach, I can use the computer (or mobile phone or ipad).  And I can experience benefits of technology.  And I feel empowered.

When technology disempowers me, it disempowers me much more than it disempowers someone without my cognitive issues.

When I cannot learn how to do something new on the computer, either because their are implied steps or there is an assumption of knowledge that I do not have, or because I am unable to break down the steps myself, I experience frustration, just like others.

What may not be like others however is that I am conscious that I am dealing with a lot of increased frustration in just going about the simple tasks of my day.   And in order to get through the day, I am already pursuing strategies to keep my daily frustrations from getting me down or getting me depressed.

So going on the computer to help me, and ending up with increased frustration, is often a risk that I cannot afford to take in my day, if I am already having a tougher time in my day than I am used to.

Or if my brain is not having a good day.   In other words, if my brain is having a harder time performing simple tasks that I normally can do.

What my team did for me was by help me by pass much of the increased frustration that working on the computer can do for me.

They were motivated to help me, and they wanted me to succeed.

They broke it down for me.

Step one is this.

Step two is that.

And they modeled for me where I want to be one day.

And when I couldn’t do a task they suggested, they broke it down differently for me.

Together we found a way for me to increase my appropriate usage of the computer.

Everyone needs models outside of themselves to inspire them and help them with the steps they need to go where they would like to go.

I needed them before my injury!

After my injury, I need them more.

Thank you Team Axis and Joseph O’Connor and to all those at Knowbility.

Thank  you, thank you!

 

Read More - Empowerment from Role Models

2015 New Year

2015

Happy New Year!

I am learning how to use my new, more accessible, website.

I asked my husband to teach me how to post pictures.  I needed reminding about where to find pictures, and he looked and found 3 pictures about the new year.

Eventually, I choose this picture.

I liked the the technological aspect of the New Year.   Based on the end of last year, I think I will be learning about how to increase my use of technology this year.   Working with my very knowledgeable team during the Knowbility Open Air Contest taught me many new things about accessibility and about my website.   It will take me practice to learn some of the new skills such as writing more accessible posts, even now that I have more of an idea of the resources that can help me with that.

The other reason I choose it was that the New Year has started in a rather blurry fashion for me, once I thought about it.   I liked that the 2015 in this picture is not sharp and distinct but blurry and less distinct.

You see, I ended 2014 feeling very empowered by the work on my website that my team and adviser and my husband and I did.   My entire team moved my website forward and helped me in ways that I did not even imagine they could, prior to the contest.

Perhaps anyone working on a website would benefit from others teaching them better ways to express themselves on their website and reflecting back to them suggestions for improvement.

For me with a brain injury, learning to pay attention to others feedback and incorporate it into my world view has been an essential part of the skills I have learned in rehabilitation and outside rehabilitation that have helped me recover as far as I have.

So having my entire team reflect back how they saw my mission and my logo and my site was very powerful for me.  The most meaningful thing that I can say is that I started the contest with a logo of a brain with a band aid on it and ended the contest with a logo of a healthy, growing brain.   I felt empowered in many ways, but most importantly I no longer identified with a brain with a band aid on it and instead I realized that I felt a sense of integration and wholeness, such that I could identify with a healthy brain.   That is what my journey has been.  And once a integrated and whole brain was reflected back to me, it was obvious to me that that was the way I felt about my journey and my brain, now.

Wow!

I felt incredibly empowered!

And then, the blurry part of 2015 that is in the picture came next.

Right at the end of December, my husband got the flu.  We had a nice New Years Day with friends and family, and then sickness and flu tore through our family–low energy, congestion, fevers, and a lot of work compensating and getting each other well.

The lightest way I can it is that we have been practicing another set of skills this New Year.   We have been practicing resilience skills.

Some of my medical resilience skills are:

–focusing on trying to get well as quickly as possible,

–focusing on keeping things from getting worse once you are sick,

–recognizing that “this to shall pass” and getting as much rest as one needs,

–being easy on oneself while one is sick;

–in other words, not try to push oneself;

–re-arranging any activities and plans that are not critical (bill-paying is critical);

–my cognition was much lower with my congestion so re-arranging activities was critical for me.

I wrote a draft blog the second week of January, and realized I should postpone working on my blog until I had more cognition and more perspective.

So I am inching my way into starting 2015.

But my sense of empowerment from participating in the Knowbility contest has kept my mood high despite not feeling well and the many tasks helping my family while they weren’t feeling well.  And helped me cope with the many rainy and cold days that Winter has brought (unusually many for Central Texas).

And when my son came down with strep throat on Friday, I realized that January may be a much tougher month than I thought.

But I still think 2015 will be a good year!   And a year of increased new learning of technology.

And now I will go learn more about how to write text that is more accessible with subheads and how to edit the alt text for the picture now that I have written my blog.   One step at a time.

Read More - 2015

Joyous man with arms raised sitting in wheelchair held aloft by people in very large concert audience

Accessibility is So Empowering

Last week, I attended a Skype meeting of my team for the Knowbility competition.   I spoke with members of my team (team Axis) and my adviser Joseph O’Connor about where we were in terms of development of my website, what had been done recently and did it work for me, and questions that I needed to bring up with the judges at the Pit Rally at Knowbility the next evening.

I found the meeting very empowering and supportive.   I learned from all of the members of my team about the kinds of things they were thinking as they were developing the website.  I learned about how a screen reader (accessibility tool for a person who is blind or cannot read the screen without assistance from a machine) would read the site and what coding needed to happen for a screen reader to read my request for left sided navigation.  I learned about font size and color contrast and the concerns that needed to be addressed there.  And I learned about how they saw my site which helped me understand more about my own thinking about my site and what’s not articulated in the text or architecture.  And I learned that I needed to know a lot more about what scientists knew about neuroplasticity before I could articulate it, and that even though I know what it is through my experience of it in my getting better since my injury that I don’t yet know how to talk about it very well, even though the increases in my neural pathways must underlie the increased functioning that allows me to be talking through skype with my team and addressing my teams questions and following my team and adviser to the extent that I am following them.   (And following them as much as I did made me appreciate how much I wasn’t understanding what they were talking about nearly as well in the last two calls!)

All kinds of information came together for me and I understood so much more about the concerns that they were already addressing to make my website more accessible.  I also had new learning about the state of the research (or lack of research) on design elements to address cognitive accessibility issues on websites.   And I began to understand just how much thought and effort my team and adviser had been doing already and were continuing to do to make my website as accessible as possible to people with cognitive disabilities.  I felt so supported and I felt so blown away by the work that had been done and I learned from everyone.  I felt like my head was about to explode (in a good way) with new ideas and connections.   I literally felt that I could feel my neural pathways strengthening and branching out and connecting and growing.   I do not know how correlated my experience of what my head felt like with what was actually happening to my neural pathways.  Hopefully someone more knowledgeable than I can tell me about that correlation that happens between brain change and learning and whether some aware people can indeed feel it or not.

Maybe I am just willing my brain to grow and the visualization that I am doing by willing and imagining it, promotes the growth.

Or perhaps since I know that my neural pathways have grown and developed in the past, I know to believe in brain growth.  Perhaps it will happen because it has happened before.  Perhaps, there is not a correlation to what I am feeling in my brain and my pathways growing.   This would be an interesting question to know the answer to!

I would like to say more about all the concrete reasons that I felt empowered, during that call.

But that will have to wait today because I need to limit my time on the computer and I have other things that have to get done today.

I do remember having an experience before my brain injury where I thought I could literally feel the pathways of my brain growing after new learning, when they finally started to develop (which seemed to take longer than I expected they should take).

So I will share my memory of that experience with you to see if you can recall a similar time when you knew you were learning something new in a way you hadn’t know it before.

I took calculus (or was it linear algebra?) in the summer time at the University of Texas to prepare for graduate school in economics.

Since it was summertime, the course moved quickly and we had three tests in a short period of time, maybe six weeks, maybe eight.

I found nothing intuitive about the math I was trying to learn.   In addition, the graduate student leading my section was very bright but his explanations of the work were not helpful to my own learning.  So I had to study really long hours and really intensively.

I remember feeling after the taking the second exam, that I finally was understanding the concepts that I had been tested on in the first exam.

And I felt that I could feel the pathways grow from the new learning (although I would have said it was just my brain growing at that time).   I could look back at the first test and understand all these problems that I had answered more by rote than anything else.   And now I could connect them and understand them!  Suddenly, I knew the material and could begin to apply it!

That is a description of what the experience felt like before my brain injury, and its how I felt after my meeting last week with my team and adviser.  Except last week the experience was even bigger.   During our call, I began to understand what my team was thinking about it a much more expanded way and how supportive it was of my own mission with my website.

How did I feel after our team meeting?

Here’s the visual that I want to leave you with.

When I watched the live streaming of the annual Accessibility, this Fall, I was impressed by a picture that one of the presenters showed about what accessibility is.

It was a picture of a woman in a chair (wheelchair) being held up off high off the ground and supported by a group of people (who did not need to use a chair to help them stand).   It was a very empowering photo of possibility when everyone works together to support someone who is differently abled.  (Please see bottom note now that picture has been added to this post.)

I looked at that picture and thought, I want to feel that kind of support around the computer and my cognitive deficits that limit my abilities.

After working with my team last Wednesday, I felt (and feel) what I imagine the woman in the chair felt.

During our team call, I felt lifted up.

During our team call, I felt supported (even more than I had already felt).

And honestly, I felt that together, the sky is the limit!

Accessibility is so, so, empowering.

—–

Bottom Note:

I came across my notes from the Accessibility Conference and found that Elle Waters had shown this picture and that it came from the Huffington Post originally.   Elle Waters sent it to me so that I could use it on my blog.

Two things I want to share that I realized when I re-read my notes and saw the picture.   I had remembered the person being lifted up as a woman, like me.   Looking at the picture, I believe he is a male.  I liked that in my memory, the person could be anyone or any gender.

And, I wrote down in my notes something important that Elle Waters had said when she showed the picture and is worth repeating.   I will paraphrase her from my notes here.   She said that true accessibility is about the crowd experience of lifting someone else up.   Its not about the isolation and frustration that the person without accessibility experiences–frustration or difficulty with new learning, or lack of access.   Its about everyone feeling lifted up by the access.

And that is what I feel and I believe that the rest of my team has felt as we have improved my website and learned and made the site more accessible.  We have all felt lifted up.

And we have all lifted each other up.

Read More - Accessibility is So Empowering

The Value of Revealing My Deficits

I attended the Knowbility Contest “Pit Rally” last Thursday to ask questions about the contest to the judges.

(If you haven’t seen my previous posts about the Knowbility Contest to improve website accessbility for non-profit organizations that I have entered my website in, please look at them. (I haven’t yet figured out a better way to reference them, but its on my list for things to cognitive challenges to learn about how to address!))

Several others from the accessibility technology community were there.

I got into a conversation with a woman named Glenda Sims who currently works for a company called Deque Systems.
(more…)

Read More - The Value of Revealing My Deficits

New Learning and Website Design

I have written about the contest (the Open Air Rally) that I am participating in through Knowbility to make my website accessible.

We are in the final two weeks of the competition.  Its very exciting.

I had a great meeting with my talented and knowledgeable development team Team AxIS from Cognitive Interactive with my team leader Antonia and the lead developer Krishna and with my esteemed team adviser Joseph O’Connor on Wednesday night last week.
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The Gift of New Learning

I have had an incredible week of ups and downs.

I am going to choose to focus on writing about one of the many ups and what I have learned and gained this week.

Simply amazing!

My son turns 6 next week, and I am just awestruck by that fact.

All the years that we waited for him to come to us, and now he is turning 6!

And its just fascinating to watch his brain develop and his cognition develop.
(more…)

Read More - The Gift of New Learning

Happy Thanksgiving

I started writing more about automaticity last week.  But, I am not ready to post it, yet.

So my post today is Happy Thanksgiving!

I love Thanksgiving.

I love the food and the time to enjoy a good meal together with family and friends.

This year, we are going out for Thanksgiving lunch.

I plan to cook pumpkin pie later in the weekend.

I was reminded about my post last year about Thanksgiving when I looked for my pumpkin pie recipe.

There was so much going on last year for me that I forgot to remember to look for the easy pumpkin pie recipe that I make.

This year, I went straight to my recipe book and found the easy pumpkin pie recipe with ginger snap crust.

Yahoo!

Its been a tough year, but I am doing much better now.

And, as far as Thanksgiving goes right now, it is all good!

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Automaticity Part 1

Last week, I wrote my first draft blog post about a term that I have learned called Automaticity.

I wanted to write about Automaticity because I knew that I was expereincing a huge increase in it, and that it was automaticity that was allowing me to do much more than my “previous normal” would allow.

I had titled the post from the week before “I did it!” because I was so amazed that I had been able to do so much and knew it was because my brain was changing and allowing what I previously could not get done in a given time period.
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Read More - Automaticity Part 1